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The Shade Tree Newsletter
Volume 91, Issues 1 & 2
January-February 2018

BULLETIN OF THE NEW JERSEY SHADE TREE FEDERATION
Editor: Richard S. Wolowicz
Executive Director: Donna Massa
ISSN # 0037-3133

Download the PDF for a complete bulletin.

HELP US SAVE SOME MORE TREES!

By Donna Massa, Executive Director

In an effort to reduce paper (AND SAVE MORE TREES!) we are transitioning from sending a "paper/hard" copy of this bi-monthly publication to sending "The Shade Tree" electronically via email to our members.

If we have your email in our database, you can expect to receive upcoming issues by email. You will no longer receive a paper/hard copy of the bi-monthly publication. If we do not have an email address for you, kindly provide one when your 2018 membership renewal roster is completed and returned to our office. Alternatively, you may send an email to trees@njstf.org requesting that your email become part of our database. For those who have already elected to receive an electronic version of "The Shade Tree," THANK YOU! For those who want to continue to receive a paper/hard copy of "The Shade Tree" through regular mail, you must advise the office of such in writing.  As we transition, you may receive both a paper/hard copy as well as an electronic version for a brief period. Kindly be understanding as we strive to make the transition as accurate as possible.

Thanks in advance for your cooperation and patience as we implement this transition and SAVE SOME MORE TREES!

CAA ANNOUNCES SPRING 2018 CLASSES

The Committee for the Advancement of Arboriculture (CAA) has announced the schedule of the spring annual Tree Climbing School & Safety Classes. The classes run 2 days per week for 5 weeks – every Wednesday and Thursday. The course begins on April 18th and ends on May 17th.… read more


THE QUEST TO RESTORE AMERICAN ELMS: NEARING THE FINISH LINE

By Suki Casanave
Cool Green Science, Aug. 9, 2017

On a humid day in mid-June, Jessica Colby is hunched over a collection of bright green stems, each one waving a leaf or two, each one a tiny banner of hope. It's almost noon, and the temperatures in the greenhouses at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst are climbing. Colby pushes her hair off her damp brow and, wielding a small blade, gently scrapes the outer layer from the stem she is holding, before dipping it in rooting powder and adding it to the lineup of cuttings anchored before her in a moistened block of foam. The leafy stems march in straight rows across the table, like a band of miniature soldiers fighting for a cause.

Colby and her fellow interns, Izzy Bazluke and Lisette Stone, are, in fact, the latest recruits in what has been a long battle to bring back one of America's most iconic trees, Ulmus americana. … read more

LTE PAGE:  TREE ROOTS NEED PROTECTION

Trees are hardy plants and their roots fight back against man-made limits around them. In the urban and suburban landscape, tree roots often are forced to grow between buildings or under driveways and walkways. As roots grow, they will break walls, pipes and patios, causing damage to properties.

Plan Before You Start

"Before you plant a new tree in your yard, you need to understand how a tree could damage your property and take appropriate measures to prevent that damage," advises Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist with the Tree Care Industry Association.

"Most damage is found six feet or less from the tree," notes Andersen, "since roots become smaller and less damaging the further they are from the trunk. Keep this in mind before you plant. That small sapling could become a large shade tree with roots spreading 30 or 40 feet outward from the trunk." … read more

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